Feature

Multisensory Enrichment for Shelter Dogs

by Mik Moeller

I have worked in the animal industry for over 18 years. I currently work at the Arizona Humane Society, where my original title was canine welfare specialist. My role is to provide mental and physical stimulation to the dogs in our care. We get a lot of medically challenged dogs, as well as hoarding cases.

Cat Division

The Clinical Animal Behavioral Gold Standard

by Myrna Milani, DVM

In the 1940s E. R. Guthrie and G. P. Horton designed an experiment to test feline problem-solving ability using a test box and cats that met the scientific standard. In the experiment, they placed individual cats inside a test box, outside of which they placed a food reward. To reach the food reward, the cats had to determine how to open the door to the box.

Horse Division

Group Living for Equines

by Lindsy Murray

In this video, Certified Horse Behavior Consultant Lindsy Murray promotes the concept of group living for equines. This is Lindsy’s herd of horses that have lived together for over 20 years. The majority of the horses and ponies were taken on as rescues in need of care and rehabilitation. Providing an environment where horses can form strong bonds and fulfill the ultimate equine priority of feeling safe has been a predominant factor in restoring their overall wellbeing.

Why promote group living?

Horses are prey animals, and group living has always been an effective strategy for survival. In the U.K., many horses are kept independently in separate paddocks and stabled or stalled for many hours a day.

Dog Division

Lives of Streeties: A study on the activity budget of free-ranging dogs

by Sindhoor Pangal

Lives of Streeties is an ongoing study that I am conducting on the street dogs of Bangalore, India. Streeties is a term of endearment that Bangaloreans use to refer to the dogs that roam free on the streets of the city. I spent most of 2015 flying back and forth from India to the US (that’s more than a 24hr long flight most times and once my layover alone was 22 hrs!).

Parrot Division

Ethological Considerations in the Care of Companion Parrots

by Greg Glendell

Parrots (Psittacines) are the most popular companion birds. However, most species are not domesticated, and they retain the behavioural traits seen in the species in the wild. Many conditions in which they are kept as pets are counter to the conditions to which they are adapted in the wild. Their ability to adapt to life as a companion bird varies considerably; some cope quite well, many do not. Those with a poor ability to adapt may exhibit a range of behavioural problems. Owners of these birds often find it difficult to address these behavioural issues and improve their birds’ lives.

Shelter Division

Spotlight on Research: Rabbits in Shelters

by the IAABC Editing Team

According to the House Rabbit Society, rabbits are the third most commonly surrendered pets in the United States. Rabbits have also been steadily gaining in popularity as indoor pets in many parts of the world, with an estimated one million pet rabbits in the United Kingdom alone. Although a quarter of pet rabbits are estimated to be adopted, there is a lack of research into how shelters and rescues can optimize the intake and adoptions process for rabbits:

Working Animals Division

Animal Assisted Play Therapy™

by Lucy Llewellyn

My name is Lucy Llewellyn, and my dog and I are “Paws4Play.” I am a qualified social worker, qualified play therapist, and Certified Animal Assisted Play Therapist. I work mostly with children who have experienced abuse, neglect, and trauma. I help these children work through these poor life experiences using a mental health intervention called play therapy. Animal Assisted Play Therapy™ is defined as “The involvement of animals in the context of play therapy, in which appropriately trained therapists and animals engage with the clients primarily through systematic playful intervention, with the goal of improving the clients’ developmental and psychosocial health as well as the animal’s well-being. Play and playfulness are the essential ingredients of the interactions and the relationship.”

The Business of Behavior

Virtual Consultations – Why, If, and How

by Katenna Jones

For eight years, I worked remotely from a home office for organizations that were in different time zones. Perhaps that is why virtual consultations came so naturally to me. However, if you are not used to spending 30 to 40 hours a week online, the concept may be somewhat daunting. My goal herein is to provide some guidance to get you thinking about if and how you might add virtual consults to your list of behavioral services, which can be appropriate for any species, from dog to cat, from horse to parrot, and from pig to bunny.

Other Topics

IAABC News for February 2017

Welcome to the first IAABC Journal of 2017. After consulting with our readers and IAABC staff, our Web developer Mychelle Blake has created a new site, making it easier than ever to find the content you’re looking for. Meanwhile, managing editor Jesse Miller has been busy finding new and unique content from all over the world, and we’re now able to publish the journal on a quarterly schedule.

IAABC Conference 8-9 April

Join us in Los Angeles for a multi-species, multi-track conference on all aspects of animal behavior consulting.

Sciences

The Clinical Animal Behavioral Gold Standard

by Myrna Milani, DVM

In the 1940s E. R. Guthrie and G. P. Horton designed an experiment to test feline problem-solving ability using a test box and cats that met the scientific standard. In the experiment, they placed individual cats inside a test box, outside of which they placed a food reward. To reach the food reward, the cats had to determine how to open the door to the box.

  • IAABC Logo and Journal Main Page Access

Subscribe